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On the table for discussion are auto accident lawyer type info and how to avoid major headaches. The Internet has taken its place beside the telephone and television as an important part of people’s lives. Consumers use the Internet to shop, bank and invest online. Most consumers use plastic to pay for online purchases, such as auto accident lawyer or other items, but other payment methods, like e-wallets, are becoming more common. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) they want you to be aware of all types of payment available to you to keep you safe and sound as much as possible. So, be alert to all info we give you as new types of payments become acceptable through wireless and mobile phones for example.personal injury law - car accident attorneys

Auto accident lawyer Info Continued

I was looking for auto accident lawyer type stuff the other day and found what I wanted at this one site and so I decided to buy what I found and I saw they accepted ATM and debit cards as well for payment. So, I looked into it and using those types of payments are basically the same as paying with plastic. Of course they may ask you to sign something or to put in your ATM PIN but that is just so you can prove it is your card by doing that stuff. So, I thought it was cool since using those cards will make the amount you just paid be sucked out of your bank account. Like a check I guess you could say only it comes out of your account much sooner then a check. Would you like to not worry about using those types of cards? I know I would – but that is NOT the case. If any purchases are made without your consent or the card is stolen or lost somewhere you may lose quite a bot of money depending on the policies of the bank you got your card through since those do not function like plastic in the respect that if it is lost or stolen you only worry about the first $100 or so. These types of cards could (depending on the bank you got them through) end up costing you a pretty penny if any of the above terrible things happen to you. What is e-money? That is considered a payment system and they are on the ‘net to make things a tad easier for you by giving you other ways of paying for items like when you are looking for auto accident lawyer info. What does “Stored-value” mean? This means a store is offering you a “gift card” instead of a gift certificate which have went by the way side with most companies since this method is easier to use for people looking for auto accident lawyer type items or anything really.

Remember we talked about refillable type cards that you can add cash to to get a higher balance? Well, those cards for the most part may have a chip in them to remember what your stored values are or they may not. There are some that once you spend the limit on them they are useless from then on so throw them away. There are some of the chipped ones that also act like plastic as well when you are looking for auto accident lawyer or similar items. Want to use a vending machine to get a snack or a pop? There are even cards for this little endeavor as well. There are Internet payment systems that will allow value to be transferred through a computer which are called e-wallets. These are used to make micropayments which are quite small payments for on or off the net for things such as auto accident lawyer, books or food.personal injury attorneys

Closing Info About auto accident lawyer

When you are looking for auto accident lawyer with your e-wallet ready to pay for anything you find. You will notice the balance decreases by the amount of your purchase. These may utilize a form of stored-value which will automatically access your account that you set up on the computer you are using for the plastic we are discussing.

Retailers slammed by Humane Society for selling real fur as fake

It’s a faux fur fake-out.

Two online retailers, Boohoo and Zacharia Jewellers, have been called out in separate rulings for promoting pompom sweaters and headbands featuring fake fur — when in fact it was real, likely rabbit.

“Consumers should be able to trust the ads they see and hear — and they certainly shouldn’t be misled into buying a faux fur product in good conscience only for it to turn out to be from a real animal,” Miles Lockwood, the UK’s Advertising Standards Authority’s director of complaints, told The Guardian. “That’s not just misleading; it can also be deeply upsetting.”

Real fur products being advertised as fake is a widespread issue in the UK that animal activist group the Humane Society International has been cracking down on. It spotted the mislabeled fluffballs in September and sent samples out for lab testing, which confirmed they were far from fake.

Both Boohoo and Zacharia have since ceased sale of the fur products — a sweater and a headband, respectively.

“We have a strong commitment against the sale of real fur in any of our products. We have robust policies and procedures in place to ensure that we are able to adhere to this,” Boohoo reps said in a statement. “Following the inquiry by HSI the item has been removed from sale. We continue to investigate the matter internally and with the supplier in question, as a matter of priority.”

Zacharia, meanwhile, blamed its Chinese manufacturer for the mix-up and pulled its listing from Amazon.

“It’s completely unacceptable that compassionate consumers setting out to buy fake fur are being misled into buying animal fur,” Claire Bass, executive director of Humane Society International, tells the BBC. “These two examples are the latest in a long list of ‘fake faux fur’ items we’ve found for sale, so we hope that the ASA’s rulings will send a strong message to the industry and make retailers work harder to give consumers confidence in avoiding cruel animal fur.”

Florida election official Brenda Snipes’ constitutional rights violated when she was suspended, judge rules

Former Broward County elections supervisor Brenda Snipes may be getting redeemed, as a Florida federal judge ruled Wednesday that former Gov. and current Sen. Rick Scott violated her constitutional rights when he suspended and “vilified” her without first allowing her to make her own case.

U.S. District Judge Mark Walker said newly inaugurated Gov. Ron DeSantis must grant Snipes a “meaningful opportunity to be heard” regarding her suspension by March 31.

Snipes came under fire during the contentious recount that followed the 2018 elections and a legally required recount in close races for governor and U.S. Senate.

In the aftermath of the November election, Snipes said she would resign on Jan. 4, but Scott immediately suspended her. Snipes then tried to rescind her resignation and challenged the governor’s suspension as “malicious” and politically motivated.

Walker ruled that Scott’s decision was an “effective termination” and violated Snipes’ due-process rights. The judge also said Scott’s order suspending Snipes contained “falsehoods.”

Still, Walker said he did not have the authority to reinstate Snipes, writing that the court was “not determining what the ultimate outcome will or should be.”

Snipes sued both Scott and the GOP-controlled Florida Senate. The lawsuit named the Senate because that chamber’s Republican leader said there wasn’t time to investigate the allegations against Snipes before her resignation took effect. Florida law requires the Senate to either remove or reinstate county officials suspended by the governor.

Snipes had been the top elections official in Broward County since 2003, when then-Gov. Jeb Bush appointed her. She had been elected three times and her current term was not scheduled to end until 2020.

Attorneys for Scott had argued the governor had the authority to remove her from office. Neither Scott nor DeSantis immediately responded to requests for comment on the decision.

Scott suspended Snipes for misfeasance, incompetence and neglect of duty, and appointed his former general counsel to take her place. In his executive order, Scott cited problems during the recount, including reports of more than 2,000 ballots being misplaced.

Snipes’ attorney, Burnadette Norris-Weeks, contended that some of the problems cited by Scott were not caused by her client.

Daniel Nordby, who has been Scott’s general counsel, said the governor took action when he did because he “determined the people of Broward County deserved a supervisor of elections” who could prepare for upcoming spring municipal elections in a “competent manner.”

Army to test and shoot weapons at new Mobile Protected Firepower prototypes

The Army plans to fire guns, rockets and cannons at prototypes of the emerging Mobile Protected Firepower vehicle to prepare the fast-tracked platform for major mechanized warfare, service officials explained.

The attacks, expected to include RPGs, crew-served weapons, small arms fire and various kinds of cannons and land-rockets, are intended to fully and accurately replicate combat as part of upcoming soldier “lethality tests” of its new MPF platform, Brig. Gen. Ross Coffman, Director, NGCV Cross-Functional Team, told reporters.

“We will take these vehicles and shoot at them to see which ones can absolutely protect our soldiers,” Coffman said. “The soldier user test will execute likely missions that an IBCT will have in full-scale combat. This includes the use of mechanized war vehicles in the close-in-fight.”

Part of these assessments, which include move-to-contact missions, assault exercises, medium range fire on static and moving targets – and mobility tests across rigorous, uneven terrain. Army developers will also look at expanding the anticipated mission requirements for the MPF, to include counter-air attacks on enemy drones and helicopters, Coffman added.

“MPF has a large cannon that would be effective against rotary wing. That would be beneficial – we are going to look at it,” Coffman said to Warrior Maven.

The prototype Mobile Protected Firepower vehicles will soon be arriving through the Army’s Rapid Prototyping deal with BAE Systems and General Dynamics Land Systems. Each vendor will deliver 12 prototype vehicles for testing and development, a key step toward a 2022 “down-select” to one vendor and the eventual construction of 504 vehicles.

The MPF is being accelerated to war, in part to meet a pressing need for mobile firepower to support rapidly advancing light infantry. Army assessments found that Infantry Brigade Combat Teams (IBCTs) lack the maneuverable firepower needed to destroy fortified enemy positions, bunkers, light armored vehicles and heavy machine gun positions.

A Congressional Research Report from October of last year reached a similar conclusion, explaining that current infantry lacks the requisite attack and mobility requirements.

“The IBCT lacks the ability to decisively close with and destroy the enemy under restricted terrains such as mountains, littorals, jungles, subterranean areas, and urban areas,” the CRS report states.

The Army’s fast-tracked plan for the MPF requires a dual-pronged acquisition approach for the service, which wants to both harness the best available weapons and technologies today – while also engineering a vehicle to be successful in war 20-years down the road. While the testing and developmental assessments are intended to be thorough, the Army plan is to prepare the platform for war on a massively expedited time frame, intended to circumvent some of the more lengthy and bureaucratic hurdles known to encumber the traditional acquisition process.

For instance, as a way to make use of readily available technologies and circumvent certain lengthy acquisition milestones, the program will not have a formal Preliminary Design Review and Critical Design Review

“One of our biggest challenges is to continue to upgrade our current platforms for anything we may go to war with today at the same time making sure we put the proper investments into our future abilities – so we are ready for the fight after next,” Maj. Gen. Brian Cummings, Program Executive Officer, Ground Combat Systems, told Warrior Maven in an interview.

Second death, more accusations sharpen focus on Ed Buck, California Democratic megadonor

Democratic Party megadonor Ed Buck faces new questions this week after Los Angeles County sheriff’s detectives opened an investigation into the second death of a man — identified by a medical examiner as 55-year-old Timothy Dean — at Buck’s home in less than two years, and a third man came forward with an account of what he described as his drug-fueled interactions with the well-connected Californian.

Deputies in West Hollywood responded early Monday morning to a report of a person not breathing at Buck’s home, and county firefighters pronounced the man dead. The cause of the death will be determined by the coroner, according to Nicole Nishida, a spokeswoman for the sheriff’s department.

But, critics are questioning whether Buck’s race — both men found dead were black — or if his wealth or political ties to the Democratic Party influenced an initial investigation of the 64-year-old who has donated tens of thousands of dollars to a slew of liberal causes and candidates over the years, including Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, and a who’s who of top California politicians.

“He definitely has not been cooperative, as his attorney says. He refused to answer any questions when I tried speaking with him,” Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Homicide Investigator Quilmes Rodriguez told Fox News via email Wednesday night.

Officials said the investigation of the second death will include a review of Gemmel Moore’s death in 2017. After a slow-moving investigation that went on for months, Buck was not charged.

“On July 27, 2017 there was a death investigation of a male adult, Gemmel Moore, who was determined to have overdosed at the same location. Mr. Edward Buck was present during both incidents,” said a recent statement from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

The Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office said the “admissible evidence is insufficient to prove beyond a reasonable doubt” that Buck gave Moore drugs or is responsible for his death in a document dated July 26 obtained by Fox News. An autopsy report said Moore died of a methamphetamine overdose.

Meanwhile, on Wednesday, The Daily Mail published an account by Jermaine Gagnon, a 28-year-old who claimed he narrowly escaped death in Buck’s apartment. Gagnon claimed to have met Buck online in April 2018 and said the Democratic megadonor flew him from Minnesota to Los Angeles.

“He was quite open about being very generous to the black community,” Gagnon said. “I’m his type, and pretty much half of the black community is his type — vulnerable, depressed. If you’re in a depressive state, that’s the energy that feeds him.”

Gagnon claims Buck injected him with crystal methamphetamine at his sex toy-filled apartment.

“He took my phone. I was so scared. I felt death walked into my soul. I called my mother. I said, ‘I feel like he’s going to kill me, I think I’m going to die,” he told The Daily Mail.

Following the discovery of the body Monday morning at Buck’s apartment, his attorney, Seymour Amster, said his client has not been arrested and is cooperating with investigators.

“From what I know, it was an old friend who died of an accidental overdose, and unfortunately, we believe that the substance was ingested at some place other than the apartment,” Amster said. “The person came over intoxicated.”

Amster, however, did not return Fox News’ emails and phone calls about the Gagnon report.

American Kennel Club’s dog museum, relocated to New York, will unleash 150 pieces showcasing furry friends

New Yorkie, New Yorkie!

Operators of the American Kennel Club’s newly relocated dog museum, opening soon in New York City, want to give visitors a chance to learn more about their furry friends, so they’re unleashing a 150-piece collection and a library area of 15,000 books.

The American Kennel Club Museum of the Dog, which operated outside St. Louis for three decades, is set to open Feb. 8 in Midtown Manhattan, featuring the club’s extensive, mostly donated collection of items.

The collection boasts portraits of royal and presidential pets; artifacts, such as an estimated 30 million-year-old fossil, that trace canine history; and devices that “match” visitors’ faces with dog breeds and let people try their hand at basic dog training. The collection also features paintings of White House dogs: U.S. President George W. Bush’s Scottish terriers, Barney and Miss Beazley, and one of President George H.W. Bush’s English springer spaniels, Millie.

“Dogs have enriched our civilization, and woven themselves into our hearts and families through the ages, and I am delighted to see them acknowledged” in plans for the museum, then-first lady Barbara Bush, who died in April, wrote in a 1990 letter that’s also displayed next to Millie’s portrait. The White House is seen in the background of the springer spaniels’ likeness.

Although there won’t be actual dogs except for special occasions, the museum hopes to give visitors “an understanding of the history of dogs, how they came to be in such variety,” said Executive Director Alan Fausel, a longtime art curator and appraiser.

The museum initially opened in the kennel club’s former headquarters in New York in 1982 but moved in 1987 to a historic house owned by St. Louis County. Officials of St. Louis County didn’t return a call Thursday from the Associated Press, but Parks Director Gary Bess told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch this week the museum’s former home will be rented out for events and exhibits.

The kennel club, which runs the nation’s oldest purebred dog registry, has taken heat in recent years from animal-welfare activists who view dog breeding as a beauty contest that fuels puppy mills. The club argues there’s value in breeding to hone various traits, from companionability to bomb-sniffing, and hopes the museum helps make the case.

New precision targeting on historic .50-cal machine gun can hit enemy drones

The Army is revving up development and delivery of advanced targeting technology for its .50-cal machine gun to increase precision, widen the mission envelope and destroy challenging targets such as enemy drones, low-flying aircraft, light-skinned armored vehicles and troop concentrations.

Senior Army officials say the service’s Rapid Equipping Force has been fast-tracking improved “slue-to-cue” technology, new sensors and emerging radar-based targeting technology to give the .50-Cal more precision accuracy.

In service for decades, the .50-Cal has naturally been thought of as largely an area weapon able to lay down suppressive fire, enabling troops to maneuver by blanketing enemy targets with rounds. The weapon of course still has this function, yet technical efforts are underway to make .50-Cal targeting more precise, such that it could shoot down swarms of quadcopters or other commercially avail mini-drones configured for attack.

The .50-Cal can fire up to 600-rounds per minute out to ranges of 7,000 yards, with an ideal attack range of 2,000 yards, Army information specifies.

Precision-guided weaponry, such as JDAMs from the air, have been operational for decades. GPS-guided land weapons such as Excalibur 155m artillery rounds or the larger GMLRS, Guided Multiple-Launch Rocket Systems, have been in combat since 2007 and 2008; engineering comparable guidance for smaller rounds, naturally, is a much more challenging task.

Non-Kinetic EW approaches have been used effectively to jam signals of ISIS drones by the Army and Air Force; senior Army officials explained that these tactics would be supplemented by emerging kinetic options as well.

Various technical efforts to engineer precision guidance for the .50-Cal have been in development for several years. In 2015, a DARPA program called Accuracy Tasked Ordnance (EXACTO) demonstrated self-steering bullets to increase hit rates for difficult, long-distance shots. DARPA’s website, which includes a video of a live-fire demonstration of the technology, states that EXACTO rounds maneuver in flight to hit targets that are moving and accelerating.

“EXACTO’s specially designed ammunition and real-time optical guidance system help track and direct projectiles to their targets by compensating for weather, wind, target movement and other factors that can impede successful hits,” DARPA.mil states.

Laser rangefinding technology is a key element of EXACTO in order to accommodate for fast-changing factors such as wind and target movement; since the speed of light is a known entity, and the time of travel of a round can also be determined, a computer algorithm can then determine the exact distance of a target and guide rounds precisely to a target.

Elements of the fast-tracked counter-drone effort, with respect to forward base protection, involves collaboration between the Army’s Rapid Equipping Force and the service’s program of record Forward Operating Base protective weapon -Counter-Rocket Artillery and Mortar (C-RAM).

The historic .50-Cal was first tested by the Army in 1918. The M2 was designed in response to both German 13mm anti-tank rifles being fielded and the thicker enemy armor appearing on the battlefield in Europe, an Army report stated.

After a number of tests, the M2 entered service in 1923 as the M1921. It is a scaled-up version of an older Browning design, the M1917 .30-cal water-cooled machine gun, and, like its predecessor, early variants of the M2 were also water-cooled. Since its first induction, the M2 has undergone a few changes, although the basic action of the weapon system has remained the same.

Remember virtual reality? Its buzz has faded at CES 2019

NEW YORK (AP) — Just a few years ago, virtual reality was poised to take over the world. After decades of near misses, the revolution finally seemed imminent, with slick consumer headsets about to hit the market and industries from gaming and entertainment to social media ready to hop on the bandwagon.

But the buzz over VR has faded to a whisper. At the CES 2019 tech show in Las Vegas, Facebook’s Oculus unit isn’t holding any glitzy press events, just closed-door demos for its upcoming Oculus Quest, a $399 untethered headset due out in the spring. Other VR companies are similarly subdued. HTC announced two new headsets — one with only sketchy details — while Sony has some kiosks for its $300 PlayStation VR set in the main hall.

It’s a world away from the scene a few years ago, when VR products from Samsung, Oculus, HTC and Sony seemed omnipresent and unstoppable at CES. These days, VR is mostly a niche product for gaming and business training, held back by expensive, clunky headsets, a paucity of interesting software and other technological shortcomings.

“VR hasn’t escaped the early adopter, gamer-oriented segment,” said Forrester analyst J.P. Gownder — himself an early adopter who chafed in 2016 at delays in shipping Facebook’s then-groundbreaking Oculus Rift system. Gownder said many existing VR setups are still too hard to use; even simpler mobile systems like Samsung’s Gear VR, he said, don’t offer “a clear reason for the average non-gamer to get involved.”

VR proponents are still dreaming big, although the challenges remain formidable. Shipments of VR headsets rose 8 percent in the third quarter compared to the previous year, to 1.9 million units, according to data research firm International Data Corp. — an uptick that followed four consecutive quarters of decline. Nearly a quarter of a million units of Facebook’s Oculus Go and Xiaomi’s Mi VR — the same stand-alone VR headset, sold under different names in different markets — shipped worldwide in the quarter, IDC said.

Those still aren’t huge numbers for a technology that seemed to hold such promise in 2012 when early demonstrations of the Oculus Rift wowed audiences — so much that Facebook acquired Oculus for $2 billion two years later. Despite large sums ploughed into the field by Facebook, Sony, Samsung, Microsoft and Google, VR hasn’t yet made much of a dent in the real world.

Some of the biggest consumer complaints involve expense, laggy or glitchy graphics and the fact that many systems still tether the headsets to gaming consoles or PCs. “Technology is still what’s holding VR back,” said eMarketer analyst Victoria Petrock. Upcoming stand-alone headsets like the Oculus Quest could solve some of those problems.

More alarming, though, VR still suffers from a lack of hit software. Many major game publishers have largely avoided the field so far, and venture funding for VR software development has nosedived this year.

SuperData, a digital games and VR market research company owned by Nielsen Holdings, estimates that consumer VR software investments dropped by a stunning 59 percent in 2018, to $173 million from $420 million the year before.

Software makers are retrenching. IMAX said in late December it was shutting down its VR unit. Jaunt, a startup focused on cinematic VR and once backed by Disney, restructured this year. Its new focus? VR’s cousin technology, “augmented reality,” which paints consumer-simulated objects into the real world, a la the cartoony monsters of “Pokemon Go.”

A few games have been modest hits. “Beat Saber” a VR game in which players move a lightsaber to music, sold over 100,000 copies in its first month and became the seventh highest-rated game on Steam, according to Forbes. But such titles are few and far between.

There’s one other problem: VR isn’t very social, Petrock said. There’s no easy way to share the experience with others on social media or within the games themselves, making a VR experience less likely to go viral the way, say, “Fortnite” has. “You have your headset strapped on and you’re in a virtual world but it is solitary,” she said.

Spirit Airlines passengers accusing airline of anti-Semitism, harassment

A Borough Park, N.Y., couple is accusing Spirit Airlines of turning a trip to Florida into an anti-Semitic “nightmare” from start to finish — calling them “r——d” as the plane took off, harassing them throughout the flight, and having cops escort them off the plane after landing.

Chana and Yisroel Beck arrived at Newark Airport on Tuesday along with their 6-week-old, 2-year-old and 3-year-old daughters, eager to embark on their weeklong trip to Fort Lauderdale.

“It was our first family trip, a nice, beautiful vacation that turned into a traumatic experience — a nightmare from the way we were treated and how we were escorted off without being told what we did wrong,” Chana, 25, told The Post on Thursday.

She said a gate agent allowed them to take their FAA-approved Doona baby carriage onto the aircraft, but that things took a wrong turn when two flight attendants at the plane entrance saw it.

“One of them said, ‘There is no way this is coming on. I don’t care who approved it at the gate. I’m the boss here and I’m going to decide if it comes on or not,’” Chana said about a flight attendant.

She said she and Yisroel, 28, complied and folded the carriage, which they initially were allowed to take to their seats because it can convert into a car seat.

A crew member then said, “’I’m not going to discuss this — this seat is going off the plane now,’” Chana said.

A fellow flier who witnessed the tumult said he overheard a steward utter “those r——d Jews” in conversation with a female flight attendant before the plane took off.

“It was clearly anti-Semitism, a personal thing,” said the 24-year-old passenger, who identified himself only as Binyamin, of Rockland County. He said he was so shocked by the repugnant comment that he came forward to tell the couple he was prepared to vouch for them.

Once the plane was airborne and the seat belt sign was turned off, Yisroel moved to his wife’s three-seat row and took their 2-year-old on his lap.

A male flight attendant ordered him back to his seat, saying regulations did not allow five people to be seated in a single row — adding that there weren’t enough oxygen masks in the event of an emergency.

“My husband didn’t argue and returned to his seat,” Chana said. “The steward, who is called Jose, told my husband ‘shut up’ when he asked him for his last name. He said, ‘You’re going to have law enforcement meeting you when the plane lands.’”

Once the plane landed, an announcement was made for all the passengers to remain seated as two police officers and two Spirit supervisors came aboard to escort the family off without explanation, she said.

“We had no idea what was happening and why they were escorting us off. We had no idea why they were making a big deal,” Chana said. “The supervisors said the (attendants) had notes on us, that we weren’t listening and that ‘just like you want us to believe your story, we have to believe what they wrote about you.’”

Adding insult to injury, Chana said, the airline supervisors said their return tickets for Jan. 15 would not be honored and that the family is no longer welcome on any Spirit flights.

Tom Steyer, billionaire anti-Trump activist, says he won’t run for president but vows $40M impeachment push

Billionaire Tom Steyer, the outspoken liberal megadonor and former hedge fund manager who has led a campaign for President Trump’s immediate impeachment, will not run for president in 2020, he announced Wednesday.

Instead, Steyer, who spoke at an event in Des Moines, Iowa, declared that he will undertake and oversee a laundry list of activities in 2019 aimed at removing Trump from office.

“Most people come to Iowa around this time to announce a campaign for president,” Steyer said in his prepared remarks. “But I am proud to be here to announce that I will do whatever it takes, for as long as it takes, to remove a president.”

Among Steyer’s goals: a “multi-million dollar digital initiative aimed at informing the public and members of Congress about the 10 impeachable offenses that Trump has already committed,” town halls across the country, and even an “impeachment summit in late January that will bring more than 250 supporters from across the country to D.C. together to learn about historical precedent for impeachment.”

That summit, Steyer promised, would be followed by an “advocacy day that will include impeachment summit participants fanning out across Capitol Hill to hand deliver articles of impeachment drafted by legal scholars to members of Congress with the simple message: ‘We did half the work, now it’s up to you to finish the job.'”

Steyer vowed in a statement to “spend 100% of his time and energy focused on removing Donald Trump from power” through the group Need to Impeach, which he founded in October 2017. He committed to spending $40 million on the effort to have Trump removed from office in 2019.

“This is the biggest issue in American politics today,” Steyer said in his speech Wednesday. “We have a lawless president in the White House who is eroding our democracy and it is only going to get worse. Donald Trump’s removal from power ultimately decides whether or not we can tackle every other challenge we face in America — and whether or not we continue to live in a democracy of, for, and by the people. It is past time for members of Congress to fulfill their constitutional duty. The question remaining is, what will Congress do?”

Steyer had been considered by many analysts to be a potential contender for the White House, and had taken apparent steps in that direction. In recent months he ran television advertisements in which he appeared personally to call for Trump’s removal, appeared at numerous political events, and even named a potential campaign manager.

In early December, Steyer laid the groundwork for a political platform, speaking alongside a panel in Charleston, S.C., at one of five scheduled town halls. Each event focused on the “Five Rights” of his potential campaign platform, which he called the “social contract for the 21st century.”

While some analysts feared his wealth and lack of political experience would alienate progressives, Steyer had an extensive array of advisers and strategists at the ready, owing in part to his longstanding involvement in national politics.

In 2013 he founded NextGen America, a political action committee and nonprofit working to combat climate change.