Retailers slammed by Humane Society for selling real fur as fake

It’s a faux fur fake-out.

Two online retailers, Boohoo and Zacharia Jewellers, have been called out in separate rulings for promoting pompom sweaters and headbands featuring fake fur — when in fact it was real, likely rabbit.

“Consumers should be able to trust the ads they see and hear — and they certainly shouldn’t be misled into buying a faux fur product in good conscience only for it to turn out to be from a real animal,” Miles Lockwood, the UK’s Advertising Standards Authority’s director of complaints, told The Guardian. “That’s not just misleading; it can also be deeply upsetting.”

Real fur products being advertised as fake is a widespread issue in the UK that animal activist group the Humane Society International has been cracking down on. It spotted the mislabeled fluffballs in September and sent samples out for lab testing, which confirmed they were far from fake.

Both Boohoo and Zacharia have since ceased sale of the fur products — a sweater and a headband, respectively.

“We have a strong commitment against the sale of real fur in any of our products. We have robust policies and procedures in place to ensure that we are able to adhere to this,” Boohoo reps said in a statement. “Following the inquiry by HSI the item has been removed from sale. We continue to investigate the matter internally and with the supplier in question, as a matter of priority.”

Zacharia, meanwhile, blamed its Chinese manufacturer for the mix-up and pulled its listing from Amazon.

“It’s completely unacceptable that compassionate consumers setting out to buy fake fur are being misled into buying animal fur,” Claire Bass, executive director of Humane Society International, tells the BBC. “These two examples are the latest in a long list of ‘fake faux fur’ items we’ve found for sale, so we hope that the ASA’s rulings will send a strong message to the industry and make retailers work harder to give consumers confidence in avoiding cruel animal fur.”

American Kennel Club’s dog museum, relocated to New York, will unleash 150 pieces showcasing furry friends

New Yorkie, New Yorkie!

Operators of the American Kennel Club’s newly relocated dog museum, opening soon in New York City, want to give visitors a chance to learn more about their furry friends, so they’re unleashing a 150-piece collection and a library area of 15,000 books.

The American Kennel Club Museum of the Dog, which operated outside St. Louis for three decades, is set to open Feb. 8 in Midtown Manhattan, featuring the club’s extensive, mostly donated collection of items.

The collection boasts portraits of royal and presidential pets; artifacts, such as an estimated 30 million-year-old fossil, that trace canine history; and devices that “match” visitors’ faces with dog breeds and let people try their hand at basic dog training. The collection also features paintings of White House dogs: U.S. President George W. Bush’s Scottish terriers, Barney and Miss Beazley, and one of President George H.W. Bush’s English springer spaniels, Millie.

“Dogs have enriched our civilization, and woven themselves into our hearts and families through the ages, and I am delighted to see them acknowledged” in plans for the museum, then-first lady Barbara Bush, who died in April, wrote in a 1990 letter that’s also displayed next to Millie’s portrait. The White House is seen in the background of the springer spaniels’ likeness.

Although there won’t be actual dogs except for special occasions, the museum hopes to give visitors “an understanding of the history of dogs, how they came to be in such variety,” said Executive Director Alan Fausel, a longtime art curator and appraiser.

The museum initially opened in the kennel club’s former headquarters in New York in 1982 but moved in 1987 to a historic house owned by St. Louis County. Officials of St. Louis County didn’t return a call Thursday from the Associated Press, but Parks Director Gary Bess told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch this week the museum’s former home will be rented out for events and exhibits.

The kennel club, which runs the nation’s oldest purebred dog registry, has taken heat in recent years from animal-welfare activists who view dog breeding as a beauty contest that fuels puppy mills. The club argues there’s value in breeding to hone various traits, from companionability to bomb-sniffing, and hopes the museum helps make the case.

Spirit Airlines passengers accusing airline of anti-Semitism, harassment

A Borough Park, N.Y., couple is accusing Spirit Airlines of turning a trip to Florida into an anti-Semitic “nightmare” from start to finish — calling them “r——d” as the plane took off, harassing them throughout the flight, and having cops escort them off the plane after landing.

Chana and Yisroel Beck arrived at Newark Airport on Tuesday along with their 6-week-old, 2-year-old and 3-year-old daughters, eager to embark on their weeklong trip to Fort Lauderdale.

“It was our first family trip, a nice, beautiful vacation that turned into a traumatic experience — a nightmare from the way we were treated and how we were escorted off without being told what we did wrong,” Chana, 25, told The Post on Thursday.

She said a gate agent allowed them to take their FAA-approved Doona baby carriage onto the aircraft, but that things took a wrong turn when two flight attendants at the plane entrance saw it.

“One of them said, ‘There is no way this is coming on. I don’t care who approved it at the gate. I’m the boss here and I’m going to decide if it comes on or not,’” Chana said about a flight attendant.

She said she and Yisroel, 28, complied and folded the carriage, which they initially were allowed to take to their seats because it can convert into a car seat.

A crew member then said, “’I’m not going to discuss this — this seat is going off the plane now,’” Chana said.

A fellow flier who witnessed the tumult said he overheard a steward utter “those r——d Jews” in conversation with a female flight attendant before the plane took off.

“It was clearly anti-Semitism, a personal thing,” said the 24-year-old passenger, who identified himself only as Binyamin, of Rockland County. He said he was so shocked by the repugnant comment that he came forward to tell the couple he was prepared to vouch for them.

Once the plane was airborne and the seat belt sign was turned off, Yisroel moved to his wife’s three-seat row and took their 2-year-old on his lap.

A male flight attendant ordered him back to his seat, saying regulations did not allow five people to be seated in a single row — adding that there weren’t enough oxygen masks in the event of an emergency.

“My husband didn’t argue and returned to his seat,” Chana said. “The steward, who is called Jose, told my husband ‘shut up’ when he asked him for his last name. He said, ‘You’re going to have law enforcement meeting you when the plane lands.’”

Once the plane landed, an announcement was made for all the passengers to remain seated as two police officers and two Spirit supervisors came aboard to escort the family off without explanation, she said.

“We had no idea what was happening and why they were escorting us off. We had no idea why they were making a big deal,” Chana said. “The supervisors said the (attendants) had notes on us, that we weren’t listening and that ‘just like you want us to believe your story, we have to believe what they wrote about you.’”

Adding insult to injury, Chana said, the airline supervisors said their return tickets for Jan. 15 would not be honored and that the family is no longer welcome on any Spirit flights.